Action Participants

Action Participants - Action Members

Dr. Chem. Aiva Plotniece (aiva@osi.lv)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 2
Laboratory of Membrane Active Compounds and β-diketones
Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis
Riga, Latvia

www.osi.lv/en

Dr. Plotniece’s group deals with  design and synthesis of new synthetic lipid-like amphiphiles as delivery systems. The group activity includes compound structure modification, chemico-physical characterization, studies of formation and properties of nanoaggregates, definition of structure-activity relationships. Equipments include Zetasizer Nano ZSP and Langmuir-Blodgett Trough (KSV NIMA).


Dr. Alexander Bilewicz (a.bilewicz@ichtj.waw.pl)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 4
Nuclear Chemistry and Radiochemistry Center
Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology
Warsaw, Poland

http://www.ichtj.waw.pl/

The group studies synthesis of the radiactive nanoparticles labelled with diagnostic (Zr-89) and therapeutic (Ra-223, 177Lu, 212Pb) radionuclides. The obtained bioconjugates are studied for stability and in vitro for internalization, radiotoxicity and receptor affinity. Detection methods include radiometric detectors, plate reader,  confocal microscopy  and flow cytometry.


Prof. Aleksandra Porjazoska Kujundziski (aporjazoska@ibu.edu.mk)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 2
Department of Industrial Engineering
International Balkan University
Skopje, Republic of Macedonia

http://www.ibu.edu.mk/

Prof. Porjazoska Kujundziski's grpup deals with the preparation and characterization of polymer nanomaterials, biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymer systems for targeted and controlled drug release and tissue engineering.


Prof. Alexey Popov (alexey.popov@oulu.fi)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Biophotonics group
Optoelectronics and Measurement Techniques unit, Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering
University of Oulu
Oulu, Finland

https://www.oulu.fi/eeng/oemlab/research%20groups/biophotonics 

The biophotonics group develops optical technologies for biomedical diagnostics at tissue and cell levels. In particular, we employ an optical tweezers technique allowing for non-destructive measurements of interaction forces between red blood cells. Optical tweezers is a convenient and promising tool to address safety of new drugs by assessing their effects on red blood cells adhesion.


Prof. Amir Fahmi (Amir.Fahmi@hochschule-rhein-waal.de)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Faculty Technology and Bionics
Rhein-Waal University of Applied Sciences
Kleve, Germany

https://www.hochschule-rhein-waal.de/en/faculties/technology-and-bionics/organisation-and-office-hours/professors/prof-dr-amir-fahmi

Prof. Fahmi's main contribution to the Cost Action is to fight cancer cells by using hybrid nanostructured materials based on dendrimers/polymerics tempalted in-situ inorganic nanomoieties.


Dr. Amitav Sanyal (amitav.sanyal@boun.edu.tr)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 3

Department of Chemistry
Bogazici University
Bebek/Istanbul, Turkey

https://sanyalgroup.boun.edu.tr/

Dr. Sanyal's main reserach focus is on the development of polymers and nanomaterials for anticancer drug delivery.


Dr. Ana Paula Candiota (AnaPaula.Candiota@uab.cat)

Working Group 3
Grup d’Aplicacions Biomèdiques de la RMN
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology/Biosciences Unit
CIBER – Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelo
Barcelona, Spain

http://gabrmn.uab.es/?q=anapaula.candiota

Preclinical and clinical biomedical applications of magnetic resonance (MR). Preclinical studies of new contrast agents, ex vivo and in vivo. MR-based molecular imaging of brain tumours, for noninvasive assessment of therapy response and immune system involvement through MR-based surrogate biomarker detection.


Dr. Ana Vujacic Nikezic (anavu@vin.bg.ac.rs)

MC substitute member
Working Group 2
Laboratory of Physical Chemistry
Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences
, University of Belgrade
Belgrade, Serbia

https://www.vin.bg.ac.rs/en/science/vinca-institute-departments/239-department-of-physical-chemistry

Dr. Vujacic Nikezic's group is developing new types of nanosystems as potential drug carriers in anticancer therapy. Activity includes synthesis and characterization of nanosystems and investigation of their bioreactivity and biocompatibility. Available laboratory facilities include UV-Vis spectrophotometry, Zeta-sizerNano, FTIR Spectrometer,AFM, UPLC/MS and ICP/MS.


Prof. Angel Raya (araya@cmrb.eu)

Working Groups 1, 2 and 3
Center of Regenerative Medicine in Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain

www.cmrb.eu

Prof. Angel Raya’s group has led to breakthrough contributions to the fields of heart development and regeneration, as well as to the development of pluripotent stem cell-based applications. Current research interests are to conduct fundamental research of excellence for advancing the clinical translation of regenerative medicine strategies based of pluripotent stem cells, including personalized medicine strategies for cancer, with special emphasis on hereditary cancers, as colorectal cancer. Our activities include the most novel strategies of cancer modelling based on human iPS cells and organoids. Currently available facilities at Prof. Raya’s lab, besides state-of-the-art laboratories and stem cell culture facilities, include Technical Platforms offering specialized support in Advanced Cell/Tissue Culture, Aquatic Animals, Embryo Micromanipulation, Bioimaging and Histology, Flow Cytometry.


Dr. Angels Sierra (masierra@clinic.cat)

Working Groups 3 and 4
Laboratory of Molecular and Translational Oncology
Institut de Investigació Biomèdica August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS)
Barcelona, Spain

http://www.idibaps.org/recerca/team/308/oncologia-molecular-i-translacional

Dr. Sierra's brain metastasis group is a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional team composed by clinicians and basic researchers who aim to develop novel strategies to improve the treatment and prevention of brain metastasis. Currently available we have experimental models to drug therapy efficacy assessment: xenografts/syngeneic models and PDX.


Prof. Ann Mari Holseater (ann-mari.holsater@uit.no)

Working Groups 1 and 2
The Drug Transport and Delivery Research Group, Department of Pharmacy
University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway
Tromsø, Norway

https://en.uit.no/om/enhet/ansatte/person?p_document_id=66829&p_dimension_id=88118

Prof. Holsaeter's expertise regarding advanced nano-sized drug delivery systems in anticancer therapy includes the formulation and characterization of liposomes and lipid based nano-delivery systems. The groups is also interested in investigating the potential of adding multiple drugs/active ingredients into the same liposome carrier to achieve synergistic antitumor activity and improved therapy. Our lab has a broad selection of liposome processing tools, including a high intensity ultrasonic processor, a LM20 Microfluidizer® High Shear Fluid Processor, The DAC150.1 FVZ-K Speedmixer,  the High pressure Lipex® extruder and a APV Micron Lab-40 high pressure homogenizer. Our experimental tools for characterization of our nanoformulations, includes standard equipment such as HPLC, plate readers, pH-meter, Osmometer, and advanced equipment for particle characterization (size and zeta potential); The PSS-NICOMP Accusizer 780/SIS and the Malvern Zetasizer ZS DLS.


Dr. Anna Laurenzana (anna.laurenzana@unifi.it)

MC substitute member
Working Group 3

Laboratory of Nanomedicine and Cell Therapy, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Science, “Mario Serio”
University of Florence

Florence, Italy
https://www.sbsc.unifi.it/

Dr. Laurenzana's research is focused on the application of plasmonic and magnetic hyperthermia for cancer treatment. She is currently combining cell-based therapies and near infrared (NIR) absorbing gold nanoparticles to achieve an efficient targeting of tumour cells providing a strong hyperthermia effect. Cell culture and immunohistochemistry facilities are available in the Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences and several equipements such as Real time PCR, Confocal-fluorescence microscopy, Flow cytometry. Small animal stabulation and transgenesis with SPF sterile room for immunodeficient animals are also available.


Dr. Antonio Paulo (apaulo@ctn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt)

Working Groups 1 and 3
Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Group, Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares (C2TN)
Instituto Superior Técnico/Universidade de Lisboa
Lisboa, Portugal

http://c2tn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt/index.php/r-d/research-groups/radiopharmaceutical-sciences/rs-home

Dr. Paulo's research focuses on the design and evaluation of nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications, namely radiolabeled NPs for PET or SPECT imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT). Our group has expertise in chemistry, radiochemistry and biological sciences, and run dedicated facilities for: i) chemical synthesis, including solid phase peptide synthesis; ii) radiosynthesis; iii) biochemical, molecular biology and cellular studies; iv) animal studies.


Prof. Antonio Villaverde (antoni.villaverde@uab.cat)

Working Group 3
Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute for Biotechnology and Biomedicine
Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain

https://ibb.uab.cat/wp-content/themes/viral/modules/ibb_membres/view_grup.php?CodiGrup=33

Prof. Antonio Villaverde develops protein-based nanoscale materials and protein drugs for biomedical applications, including precision medicine for metastatic cancer.


Prof. Antonios Kanaras (a.kanaras@soton.ac.uk)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 3
Laboratory of Inorganic Nanoparticles and Applications
School of Physics and Astronomy, Institute for Life Sciences
University of Southampton
Southampton, United Kingdom

www.licn.phys.soton.ac.uk

Prof. Kanaras current research related to this Cost action involves the design of nanoparticles for: tumor angiogenesis inhibition, skin penetration, mRNA sensing and anticancer drug delivery in cells, and stem cell sorting. The interests of the Kanaras group are focusing on the conjugation of nanoparticles with biomolecular ligands of interest (e.g. peptides, oligonucleotides etc..), the understanding of the nanoparticle-cell interactions and the design of nanoparticles with multiple roles.


Dr. Atida Selmani (aselmani@irb.hr)

Working Groups 2 and 3
Laboratory for Biocolloids and Surface Chemistry, Division of Physical Chemistry
Rudjer Boskovic Institute
Zagreb, Croatia

https://www.irb.hr/eng/People/Atida-Selmani

Dr. Selmani is working on selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) synthesis and physico-chemical characterization, assessment of stability, aggregation, uptake and fate in relevant biological media for the further development of SeNPs as an anticancer vehicle.


Dr. Aura Tintaru (aura.tintaru@univ-amu.fr)

Working Groups 1, 2 and 3
Institute of Radical Chemistry - UMR 7273 (ICR UMR7273)
Aix-Marseille Université 
Marseille, France

https://icr-amu.cnrs.fr/

Dr. Aura Tintaru is currently working on the development of new analytical methodologies in order to accurately characterize the structure of nanotheranostics. The methods used involve state of the art NMR and MS experiments; the results provide useful information about the purity, size and shape of the aggregates. 


Prof. Aysegul Oksuz (ayseguluygun@sdu.edu.tr)

Working Group 1
Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry
Suleyman Demirel University
Merkez/Isparta, Turkey

https://w3.sdu.edu.tr/personel/01040/prof-dr-aysegul-oksuz

Prof. Oksyz's laboratory main research objectives are: designing nano-/micromotors for cancer diagnosis and drug delivery systems developing synthesis, modification of conducting polymers, electrically conductive blends and composites, nanocomposites, biosensors, plasma polymerization, plasma modification, electrochromic devices, nanofibers, photovoltaics.


Prof. Bernhard Knapp (bknapp@uic.es)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Basic Sciences Department, Bioinformatics and Immunoinformatics Research Group
UIC Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain

http://uic.es/ca/salut/recerca/bioinformatics-research-group

We provide novel insight in fundamental processes of the immune system by means of quantitative analysis and predictive models (e.g. Protein structure modelling, Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, Machine learning, Genetic Algorithms, Artificial Neural Networks etc). More specifically the work focuses on how T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognise Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) bound peptides in different health and disease conditions as for example allergies, cancer, autoimmune diseases, or infections. Apart from TCR/peptide/MHC interactions also antibody/antigen interactions are a key research interest of the group.


Assist. Prof. Bilge Guvenc Tuna (bilgeguv@gmail.com)

Working Group 3
Department of Biophysics
Faculty of Medicine, Yeditepe University
Ataşehir/İstanbul, Turkey

http://www.yeditepe.edu.tr/sites/default/files/documents/web_bilge_guvenc_tuna.pdf

Prof. Tuna’s group is developing new aptamer conjugated targeted and controlled nano-drug delivery systems for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Currently, cell culture and in-vivo cancer and cardiovascular disease models can be performed in her lab.


Prof. Biljana Ristic (biljka15@gmail.com)

Working Group 3
Laboratory of Immunology, Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine
University of Belgrade
Belgrade, Serbia

http://www.mfub.bg.ac.rs/eng/home/

We are investigating antitumor potential different nanoparticles (ex. graphene quantum dots-GQD) in vitro. We are analyzing their biocompatibility, cellular uptake, localization and underlying mechanisms of antitumor effects (type of cell death, role of oxidative stress and autophagy) on different tumor cell lines.


Prof. Boris Majaron (boris.majaron@ijs.si)

MC substitute member
Working Group 2

Department for Complex Matter
Jozef Stefan Institute
Ljubljana, Slovenia

http://www-f7.ijs.si/research/research-biomedical-optics/

Prof. Majaron is working in the field of biomedical optics, which involves development of innovative techniques for noninvasive characterization of biological tissues and organs, laser treatments of various pathologies, and nanostructures for bioimaging and photothermal therapy. The expertise and techniques in the group include optical spectroscopy (absorption, fluorescence and lifetimes), Raman microscopy, SWIR radiometry, DLS, and numerical modeling of light-tissue interaction. 


Dr. Božana Čolović (bozana@vinca.rs)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Laboratory of Atomic Physics
Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade
Belgrade, Serbia

https://www.vin.bg.ac.rs/

Dr. Colovic's research is focused on the synthesis of new materials to serve as carriers for targeted and controlled delivery of anticancer drugs.


Dr. Branislav Nastasijevic (branislav@vinca.rs)

Working Group 3
Laboratory of Physical Chemistry
Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade
Belgrade, Serbia

https://www.vin.bg.ac.rs/en/science/vinca-institute-departments/239-department-of-physical-chemistry

Dr. Nastasijevic is engaged in the project, which investigates the interaction of the enzyme with toxic and pharmacologically active molecules as well as their influence on cell proliferation. Compounds used for these studies are metal complexes, herbal extracts and their constituents, as well as functionalized nanoparticles. Within the laboratory, the available instruments are UPLC with PDA, TQD and FLD detectors, ATR-FTIR, GC-MS and ICP-OES.


Prof. Brigitte Voit (voit@ipfdd.de)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 2
Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry
Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden e.V.
Dresden, Gernany
School of Science, Faculty of Chemistry and Food Chemistry
Technische Universität Dresden

Dresden, Germany
https://www.ipfdd.de/index.php?id=683&type=0&L=0

Prof. Voit’s group carries out the design, synthesis and deep physical-chemical characterization of multifunctional, bioactive and responsive polymer structures and associates for use in nanomedicine. This work comprises especially dendritic polymers with special emphasize on glycodendrimers, but also responsive polymersomes and nanocapsules as well as multicompartment structure for drug delivery as well as cell mimetics.


Prof. Bruno Sarmento (bruno.sarmento@ineb.up.pt)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4
Nanomedicines & Translational Drug Delivery, Institute of Biomedical Engineering
University of Porto
Porto, Portugal

http://www.i3s.up.pt/content/research-group-detail?x=109

Prof. Bruno Sarmento’s current research is focused on the development of functionalized nanomedicines and their application in the pharmaceutical and biomedical fields. In particular, nanoformulations of biopharmaceutical drugs and molecules with pharmacokinetic issues with interest in cancer. The group has establish several cell-based in vitro models to assess the functionality of nanomedicines and in vivo animal models to evaluate PK/PD profiles. He has also specialized in mucosal tissue engineering models to validate functionalized nanomedicines and to perform in vitro/in vivo correlation.


Dr. Camillo Rosano (camillo.rosano@gmail.com)

Working Groups 1 and 3
Laboratory of Proteomics
IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino
Genoa, Italy

http://www.hsanmartino.it/

Dr. Rosano is developing new vector nanomedicines for targeting lung cancer.


Dr. Carles Arús (carles.arus@uab.cat)

Working Group 3
Grup d’Aplicacions Biomèdiques de la RMN
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology/Biosciences Unit
CIBER – Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelo
Barcelona, Spain

http://gabrmn.uab.es/?q=carles.arus

Preclinical and clinical biomedical applications of magnetic resonance (MR). Preclinical studies of new contrast agents, ex vivo and in vivo. MR-based molecular imaging of brain tumours, for noninvasive assessment of therapy response and immune system involvement through MR-based surrogate biomarker detection.


Dr. Carlo Morasso (carlo.morasso@icsmaugeri.it)

Working Groups 2 and 4
Laboratory of Nanomedicine and Molecular Imaging
Istituti Clinici Scientifici Maugeri IRCCS
Pavia, Italy

https://www.icsmaugeri.it/

ICS Maugeri is a private research hospital recognised as centre of excellence by the Italian Ministry of Health (IRCCS) focused on the treatment of cancerous and chronic diseases. The Nanomedicine and Molecular Imaging Laboratory is focused on the development nano-delivery systems and contrast agents for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.


Dr. Carlos Rodriguez-Abreu (carlos.rodriguez@iqac.csic.es)

Working Group 2
Colloidal and Interfacial Chemistry Group
Institute for Advanced Chemistry of Catalonia (IQAC), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)
Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN)
Barcelona, Spain

https://www.iqac.csic.es/qci/

Dr. rodriguez-Abreu's group deals with the development of colloidal multifunctional nanocarriers as delivery systems. The group activity includes formulation and physicochemical characterization. Currently available facilities include Dynamic and Static Light Scattering, Rheometry, SAXS, Gas sorption, High resolution Optical Microscopy, etc.


Prof. Catarina Pinto-Reis (catarinareis@ff.ulisboa.pt)

Working Groups 2, 3 and 4
Faculty of Pharmacy
Nanostructured Systems for Overcoming Biological Barriers (Nano2B) from iMedUlisboa
University of Lisboa
Lisboa, Portugal

http://imed.ulisboa.pt/

Prof. Pinto-Reis is developing new nanomedicines through a multidisciplinary platform; it has been focused on development and biological evaluation of drug delivery systems for oral, dermal and transdermal delivery, with special interest on metallic and polymeric nanocarriers. Other interests are the establishment of animal models of cancer and metabolic diseases. The laboratory activity includes nanomedicine design, chemico-physical characterization of the resultant nanosystems and  their in vitro/in vivo characterization. Currently available facilities at iMedUlisboa are: cell culture facility, biosafety level 3, gene expression, animal facility, radioisotope, molecular bioscreening, bioimaging, computer assisted drug design, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, etc.


Prof. Claudio Nastruzzi (nas@unife.it)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences/Biomaterials & Encapsulation Laboratory (BEL)
University of Ferrara
Ferrara, Italy

http://www.biomaterials.it/research.html

Prof. Nastruzzi's group is working on drug delivery, polymeric nano- and micro-systems, solid lipid nanoparticles, liposomes and microemulsions, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip, and cell encapsulation.


Dr. Cosmin Farcau (cosmin.farcau@phys.ubbcluj.ro)

MC member substitute
Working Group 2
Center for Nanobiophotonics and Laser Microspectroscopy (CNLM)
Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences
Babes-Bolyai University
Cluj-Napoca, Romania

https://sites.google.com/site/farcaucosmin/

Dr. Farcau research focuses on fabrication of nanostructured surfaces by colloidal convective self-assembly and colloidal lithography, optical properties simulations and charaterisation, optical spectroscopies (Surface Enhanced Raman, Surface Enhanced Fluorescence), and applications to sensing. Currently available facilities at CNLM include optical spectrophotometers, metal film deposition system, home-made convective self-assembly setup, confocal
Raman microscope, and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.


Dr. Danail Hristozov (danail.hristozov@emerge.bg)

Working Groups 2 and 3
East European Research and Innovation Enterprise (EMERGE)
Bulgaria

http://emerge.bg/

Dr. Danail Hristozov is developing strategies and (software) tools for the safety assessment and risk-benefit analysis of nano(bio)materials used in medical applications.


Prof. Daniel Jaque (daniel.jaque@uam.es)

Working Groups 2 and 3
Fuorescence Imaging Group, Department of Physics of Materials, Department of Biology and Department of Physiology
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Madrid, Spain

https://sites.google.com/site/fluorescenceimaginggroup/

Prof. Jaque´s group is currently working on the development of novel nanomaterals for deep tissue imaging, controlled thermo-therapies and molecular imaging of cardiovascular system in small animal models. Prof. Jaque´s group is able to perform in vivo and in vitro studies and has a number of different techniques for advanced characterization of nanomaterials (optical spectroscopy, electron microscopy, characterization of colloidal systension , etc..).


Prof. Daniel Ruiz Molina (dani.ruiz@icn2.cat)

Working Groups 2 and 3
Nanostructured Functional Materials (Nanosfun)
Istitut Catala de Nanociencia I Nanotecnologia (ICN2)
Barcelona, Spain

https://nanosfun.icn2.cat/

Nanosfun research group has focused on the design, synthesis, physicochemical characterization, and in vitro/in vivo assays for the development of new nanoconstructs based on organic polymers and metal-organic coordination polymers with application in specific diseases.


Prof. Daniele Passarella (daniele.passarella@unimi.it)

Working Group 1
Department of Chemistry
University of Milan
Milan, Italy

http://eng.chimica.unimi.it/ecm/home

Prof. Passarella’s group is developing new self-assembled nanoparticles by chemical modification of known anticancer drugs as building blocks. This approach produces hetero-nanoparticles (combination therapy) and fluorescent nanoparticles. Currently available facilities at Prof. Passarella’s lab are: chemical synthesis, chemical purification, NMR and MS analysis, nanoparticles characterization, and in silico design.


Dr. David Kryza (david.kryza@univ-lyon1.fr)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Laboratoire d'Automatique, de Génie des Procédés et de génie Pharmaceutique, LAGEPP, UMR5007 
University of Lyon
Lyon, France

https://lagepp.univ-lyon1.fr/

Dr. David Kryza’s group is developing new theranostics nanomedicines thanks to the IMTHERNAT platform. IMTHERNAT is a preclinical platform devoted to the transfer of probes (either molecules or nanoparticles) from bench to bedside. It is based within the Hospices Civils de Lyon, closely linked to LAGEP. It is composed of imaging systems (μSPECT-CT, optical imaging), small animal housing unit and radiochemistry laboratory allowing to perform diagnostics imaging or therapeutical studies. Radiopharmacist and nuclear medicine physician associated with biologists and physicists possesses all the expertise to translate tracers (peptides, MAbs) and nano-objects to the clinic.


Dr. Domenico Marson (domenico.marson@dia.units.it)

Working Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4
Molecular Biology and Nanotechnology Lab (MolBNL@UniTS)
Department of Engineering and Architecture
University of Trieste
Trieste, Italy

http://www.mose.units.it/default.aspx

Dr. Marson is active in the discovery of new cancer nanomedicines from computer-assisted design to their in vitro activity. The MolBNL@UniTS Lab has access to local and natoonal/international supercomputers for the in silico studies, synchrotron radiation facility for structural studies, different spectroscopic, spectrophotometric and other analytica instruments for nanomedicine characterization, including CD-based stopped flow apparatus and isothermal titration calorimetry for kinetic and thermodynamic measurements. Different  naive and durg resistant cell lines are also avaialbe for in vitro efficacy of nanomedicines.


Prof. Dganit Danino (dganitd@technion.ac.il)

MC substitute member
Working Group 2

Self Assembly and CryoEM Laboratory of Soft Matter
Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
Haifa, Israel

https://dganitdanino.net.technion.ac.il

Prof. Danino's group research includes (1) Design and development of lipid and protein nanostructured carriers for oral drug delivery  and (2)  State of the art cryo-electron microscopy including 3D cryo-tomography for analyzing soft molecular assemblies as micelles, vesicles etc’, in addition to physico-chemical characterization. Current facilities include high-resolutin electron microscopes (TEMs and SEM) operating at cryogenic temperatures and low dose, isothermal titration calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, and circular dichroism.


Dr. Dragomira Mahjen (david.kryza@univ-lyon1.fr)

MC substitute member
Working Group 3

Laboratory for Cell Biology and Signalling, Division of Molecular Biology
Ruđer Bošković Institute
Zagreb, Croatia

https://www.irb.hr/eng/People/Dragomira-Majhen

Dr. Mahjen's group is investigating adenovirus based vectors aimed at gene transfer and vaccination, namely innate immune response induced by adenovirus vector infection with aim of constructing better performing adenovirus based vectors. We are experienced in standard cell culture methods and methods used in molecular biology, adenovirus construction and purification, confocal microscopy.


Dr. Dusan Sredojevic (dusredo@vinca.rs)

Working Group 2
Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry and Physics
Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinča, University of Belgrade
Belgade, Serbia

https://www.vin.bg.ac.rs/en/science/vinca-institute-departments/237-department-of-radiation-chemistry-and-physics

Dr. Sredojevic's group is developing new organic-inorganic hybrids using oxide nanoparticles as carriers of biologically active molecules to determine their toxicity and antioxidant properties. The laboratory activity includes DFT calculations, synthesis and variety of characterization. Currently available facilities at Dr Nedeljković's lab include different spectroscopic (UV-Vis, NIR, FTIR, PL), thermal (TGA, DSC), and microstructural (XRD, AFM) techniques.


Prof. Eduardo Fernandez-Megia (ef.megia@usc.es)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1, 2 and 3
Center for Research in Biological Chemistry and Molecular Materials (CIQUS)
University of Santiago de Compostela
Santiago de Compostela, Spain

https://www.usc.es/ciqus/es/informacion-general/personal/eduardo-fernandez-megia

Fernandez-Megia's lab focuses on the interface between chemical biology and polymer chemistry with emphasis on the preparation of dendrimers and well-defined micelles and vesicles for cancer drug delivery, radionanotherapy, and diagnosis (MRI, PET, SPECT, NIR). The laboratory activity includes polymer synthesis, the preparation and characterization of nanoassembles, and in their vitro evaluation. Special interest is devoted to click & accelerated bioconjugations for stimuli-responsive materials.


Prof. Eleonore Fröhlich (eleonore.froehlich@medunigraz.at)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 3 and 4
Center for Medical Research
Medical University of Graz
Graz, Austria

https://zmf.medunigraz.at/core-facilities/cf-imaging/

The group studies toxic effects in vitro (permeation across epithelal barriers, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, hemocompatibility) of nanoparticles, implants, and chemical compounds in 2D and 3D models. Detection methods include plate reader, epifluorescence and confocal laser scan microscopy, High Content Screening, atomic force microscopy, and flow cytometry.


Dr. Enrico Catalano (enrico.catalano@medisin.uio.no)

Working Groups 2 and 3
Laboratory of Nanomedicine for anticancer treatments, Department of Clinical Molecular Biology (EpiGen)
University of Oslo
Olso, Norway

https://www.med.uio.no/klinmed/english/about/organization/divisions/medicine-laboratory-sciences/clinical-molecular-biology/

Dr. Catalano's research focuses on dual tumor targeting therapy on breast cancer cells based on drug-bioconjugated iron-oxide nanoparticles. His research wants to achieve a smart nanomedicine platform of targeted drug delivery for cancer treatments based on magnetic properties of iron-oxide nanoparticles that overcomes multiple biological barriers for cancer drug delivery to target accurately the cancer site with magnetic nanoparticles under the influence of an external magnetic field.  The aim of his research is to produce a dual targeted drug delivery system and magnetic hyperthermia for more effective treatment of breast cancer by using functionalized iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) loaded with drugs/targeting moieties which will able to be localized in target tissues and internalized within the desired cells by application of an external magnetic field. The framework of the project aims to implement in vitro experiments for an extremely innovative multi-therapeutic strategy that combines targeted drug delivery of chemotherapeutics, the use of SPIONs properties of hyperthermia to target in vitro breast cancer drug-resistant and not drug-resistant cell lines.


Dr. Eugenia Mato Matute (emato@santpau.cat)

Working Group 3
Laboratory of Edrocrinology and Nutrition
CIBER-BBN, Institut de Recerca Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (IIbSantPau)
Barcelona, Spain

https://www.ciber-bbn.es/

Prof. Corcoy’s group in collaboration with Dr. Pedraz's group, are focus the interest in the development of a new therapeutic tool for patients with advanced or metastatic thyroid carcinomas. We use of PLGA nanoparticles decorated with monoclonal antibodies for delivery different tyrosine kinase inhibitors with therapeutical effects, evaluating in vitro and as well in preclinical studies (on going) their therapeutically efficacy.


Dr. Evgeny K. Apartsin (eka@niboch.nsc.ru)

NCC MC observer
Working Groups 1 and 2
Laboratory of RNA Chemistry
Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine
Novosibirsk, Russia

http://www.niboch.nsc.ru/doku.php/en/structure/labs/ven

Dr. Apartsin is involved into the development of new materials for the delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids. In particular, he deals with dendrimer-based and liposome-based nucleic acid carriers (in close collaboration with other COST partners). The Laboratory of RNA Chemistry possess the necessary equipment and experience for the synthesis and purification of oligonucleotides, organic synthesis as well as physico-chemical studies.


Prof. Ewa Sawosz (ewa_sawosz@sggw.pl)

Working Group 3
Laboratory of Nanobiotechnology, Department of Animal Nutrition and Biotechnology
Warsaw University of Life Sciences
Warsaw, Poland
http://kzbz.pl/en/laboratoria-2/

Prof. Sawosz's group is interested in the effect of carbon allotropes and noble metals on the status of tumour cells and tissues in in vivo, in ovo and in vitro research. Mechanisms of nanostructures` toxicity. Nanostructures as modifies of angiogenesis in tumour. Research is carried out on tumour and normal cells, bacteria, chicken embryo and rat models. The laboratories include equipment for cell cultivation, embryo incubation, microscopic visualisation, histochemistry, gene expression, activities of enzymes, concentrations of DNA, RNA, Ig. 


Dr. Federico Benetti (f.benetti@ecamricert.com)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 2
ECSIN Laboratory
ECAMRICERT SRL

Padova, Italy
http://ecsin.it/en/

ECSIN Laboratory mission is the sustainable development of nanotechnologies. It faces this important challenge with an integrated approach that includes physico-chemical characterization of nanotechnologies, as nanomedicines, their safety evaluation and nano-specific risk assessment and management. ECSIN has state-of-the-art facilities for studying nanotechnologies. Physico-chemical characterization of nanomedicines can be done by using TEM-STEM-EDX, spICP-MS, BET (accredited by Accredia), A4F and DLS-zeta potential, while their safety can be tested applying cellular and molecular approaches and standard operating procedures. Risk assessment and management are performed using both commercially available and ad hoc open source software.


Dr. Fotios Mpekris (fmpekr01@ucy.ac.cy)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 3 and 4
Cancer Biophysics Laboratory, Department of Mechanichal and Manufacturing Enginneering
University of Cyprus
Cyprus

http://www.ucy.ac.cy/cancer_biophysics/en

During my research, I focus on the development of strategies that remodel the tumor microenvironment to improve drug delivery and thus, therapeutic outcomes. I  trained as a biomedical engineer and mathematical modeller, and received experimental training on the biomechanical characterization of solid tumors. Also i trained in murine tumor models, small laboratory animal handling and surgical procedures as well as in anticancer drug treatments. 


Prof. Francisco Javier De la Mata (javier.delamata@uah.es)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 2
BIOINDEN GROUP, Department of Organic and Inorganic Chemistry
University of Alcala
Alcalá de Henares, Spain

https://portal.uah.es/portal/page/portal/grupos_de_investigacion/164/Presentacion/QuienesSomos

BIOINDEN group is developing new dendritic nanomedicines for different biomedical applications, such as gene carriers and antitumoral, antibacterial or antiviral agents. The laboratory activity includes nanomolecules synthesis and chemico-physical characterization, as well as in vitro evaluation. Prof. De la Mata’s lab have access to several experimental tools including NMR, IR, UV-Vis, mass spectrometry, electronic microscopy, etc…


Dr. Gemma Janer (gjaner@leitat.org)

Working Group 3
Human and Environmental Health and Safety
LEITAT Technological Center
Barcelona, Spain

https://www.leitat.org/english/

Dr. Janer’s group is assessing human and environmental toxicity of nanomaterials. The laboratory activity includes in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, and is mainly interested on the oral and parenteral routes of exposure. 


Dr. Giovanna Lollo (giovanna.lollo@univ-lyon1.fr)

Working Groups 1, 2 and 3
LAGEPP CNRS UMR 5007-Team Gepharm
University Claude Bernard Lyon 1
Lyon, France

https://lagepp.univ-lyon1.fr/en/home/

Dr Lollo works in the design and development of novel delivery nanosystems for drug and gene delivery. Mainly, her research is focused on implementation of conventional chemotherapeutic strategies with immunotherapeutic approach. The laboratory activity includes in-depth physico-chemical characterization of the formulation developed. The over facilities of the laboratory are listed on the webpage https://lagepp.univ-lyon1.fr/en/scientists-equipments-material/


Prof. Giovanni Tosi (gtosi@unimore.it)

Working Groups 2, 3 and 4
Lab Nanomedicine & Pharmaceutical Technology
Departmnt of Life Science
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
Modena, Italy

www.nanomedicine.unimore.it

Prof. Tosi's group displays expertise in the production of NPs engineered with different ligands as tools for BBB crossing evaluation along with the production of fluorescent and easy-detectable NPs as tools for evaluation of in vitro interaction or BBB crossing after in vivo administration. Moreover, full chemico-physical, morphological and pharmaceutical characterization of any “tool” will be developed.  Along with this “pharmaceutical” nanotechnology aim, UNIMORE could also perform in vivo experiments on WT and KO animal models (AD model, 5*FAD), meaning systemic injection in rodents (i.v. or i.p.), followed by NPs detection and assessment of BBB crossing and brain targeting. In fact, selected validation protocols (i.e. Confocal Microscopy, HPLC-Fluorimeter-MS for detection and quantification) are ready to be used to evaluate BBB crossing or localize NPs within parenchyma or even at cellular level after in vitro or in vivo experiments.


Dr. Guillermo de la Cueva-Méndez (gdelacueva@bionand.es)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 3 and 4
Synthetic Biology and Smart Therapeutic Systems/Dept. of Therapeutic Nanosystems
Andalusian Centre for Nanomedicine and Biotechnology (BIONAND)
Malaga, Spain

http://www.bionand.es/groups/sbstnl   
Nanobioengineering of smart therapeutic and diagnostic systems
Institute of Biomedical Research in Malaga (IBIMA)
Malaga, Spain

http://www.ibima.eu/grupo_investigacion/nanobioingenieria-de-sistemas-terapeuticos-y-diagnosticos-inteligentes/  

Our group integrates basic researchers and clinicians of multiple relevant backgrounds to combine synthetic biology, nanotechnology, and both preclinical and clinical research with the aim of developing smart therapeutic and diagnostic nanosystems for the early detection and effective treatment of cancer. Our activity spans the design of modularly functionalisable core nanoparticles (of chemical or biological origin), their production, assembly and characterization, the analysis of their toxicity in vitro and in vivo, as well as of their biodistribution and therapeutic/diagnostic efficacy in animal models, using a broad range of physical-chemical-biological techniques.


Dr. Helena Oliveira (holiveira@ua.pt)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 2 and 3
Department of Biology
University of Aveiro
Aveiro, Portugal

www.cesam.ua.pt/holiveira

In our lab we study the biological interactions of nanomaterials. Currently, we are devoted to the study of nanomaterials for cancer photodynamic therapy, induced hyperthermia and drug delivery. The laboratory is fully equipped for in vitro cell culture, microscopy analysis, flow cytometry, microplate reading, gene expression and nanoparticle physico-chemical characterization.


Dr. Helinor Johnston (h.johnston@hw.ac.uk)

Working Groups 3 and 4
Nano Safety Research Group, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences
Institute of Biological Chemistry, Biophysics and Bioengineering
Heriot Watt University
Edinburgh, United Kingdom

https://researchportal.hw.ac.uk/en/persons/helinor-jane-johnston

Dr Johnston's group specialises in the assessment of nanomaterial toxicity. A key area of research activity is developing alternatives to animal testing (e.g. in vitro models, zebrafish embryos) to support implementation of the 3Rs principles.


Prof. Huveyda Basaga (huveyda@sabanciuniv.edu)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 3 and 4
Molecular Biology Genetics and Bioengineering Program (MBGB) and Sabanci University Nanotechnology Research Center
Sabanci University
Tuzla/İstanbul, Turkey

http://myweb.sabanciuniv.edu/huveyda/

Prof. Basaga's lab currently focuses on characterization of the biological effects of drug loaded nanoparticles in several cell lines. In one of our projects, we are trying to increase antioxidant defence capacity of cells by using a nano-antioxidant system. For this purpose, a nanosystem has been developed and  tested in various cell lines. We are also seeking to design and implement a nanoparticle-porphyrin based theranostic agent to be used in targeted photodynamic therapy. Our specific aims regarding theranostics are: a) to develop new tools for one step imaging and therapy for cancer; b) to understand the role of antioxidant response in nanosystem based photodynamic therapy, and c) to develop and understand the mechanisms of novel theranostic tools for anti-cancer treatment.


Dr. Igor Balaz (igor.balaz@df.uns.ac.rs)

Working Groups 1 and 4
Group for Meteorology, Physics and Biophysics
University of Novi Sad
Novi Sad, Serbia

http://evonano.eu/about/pfns/

Dr. Balaz’s group is developing an AI computational platform for the autonomous generation of new strategies for
targeting solid tumors using functionalized nanoparticles. In its final form the model will simulate all the main
aspects of nanoparticle dynamics: their travel via blood streams, extravasation, tumour penetration and endocytosis. It is part of the H2020 EVO-NANO project whose goal is to establish, for the first time, an integrated pipeline which goes from AI-powered artificial evolution of novel nanoparticle-based Drug Delivery Systems, to their synthesis, rapid testing in vitro on a newly developed microfluidic-based platform, and finally translation to pre-clinical trials through in vivo validation.


Dr. Ivana Vukoje (ivanav@vin.bg.ac.rs)

Working Group 2
Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry and Physics
Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinča, University of Belgrade
Belgrade, Serbia

https://www.vin.bg.ac.rs/en/science/vinca-institute-departments/237-department-of-radiation-chemistry-and-physics

Dr. Vukoje's research interests on developing new organic-inorganic hybrids using oxide nanoparticles as carriers of biologically active molecules to determine their toxicity and antioxidant properties.


Dr. Ivana Drvenica (ivanav@vin.bg.ac.rs)

Working Groups 2 and 3
Group of Immunology
Institute of Medical Research, University of Belgrade
Belgrade, Serbia

http://www.imi.bg.ac.rs/eng/home

Current research strictly related to the action aims and goals: Development and chemico-physical characterization of nano-sized erythrocyte membrane based drug delivery systems (nanoerythrosomes and erythrocyte membrane cloaked nanoparticles).


Dr. James Wells (james.wells@ptb.de)

Working Groups 2 and 4
Division 8.23 - Metrology for Magnetic Nanoparticles 
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)
Berlin, Germany

https://www.ptb.de/cms/en/ptb/fachabteilungen/abt8/ag-823.html

The work group "Metrology for Magnetic Nanoparticles" provides new measurement procedures for the sensitive detection of magnetic nanoparticles in biological environments. The group also conducts research and development in the fields of magnetic hyperthermia for cancer therapy, and biomedical imaging techniques including Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, PTB contributes to the standardization of magnetic nanoparticles for the safe application of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine, and contributes national experts to ISO technical committee 229 - Nanotechnology.


Prof. Jean Pierre Majoral (majoral @lcc-toulouse.fr)

MC member substitute
Working Groups 1 and 2
Laboratoire Chimie de Coordination, CNRS Toulouse
Toulouse, France
https://www.lcc-toulouse.fr/?lang=fr

The group is developing ways of synthesis of original phosphorus dendrimers (anionic, cationic, neutral or complexed with different metals) for use  against several diseases (cancers, tuberculosis, inflammation ...). In vitro experiments can be conducted and access to in vivo experiments is possible.  Phosphorus dendrimers structures can be established and controlled using a variety of physico-chemical methods. Fluorescent dendrimers will be used for theranostic purposes.


Prof. Jesus M. De la Fuente (jesusmartinezdelafuente@gmail.com)

Working Group 3
Aragón Materials Science Institute
Spanish National Research Council
Zaragoza, Spain

http://bionanosurf.unizar.es/

Our research group is on the search of new biomarkers for the detection and monitoring of treatments against cancer, new transduction systems and new molecular imaging techniques using nanoparticles as a central element. We are also working on the development of advanced therapies, mainly against cancer based on the rational design of new multifunctional nanoconjugates. On the other hand, we are also working on new therapies using the differential physical properties of gold and magnetic nanoparticles.


Prof. Jesus Santamaria (jesus.santamaria@unizar.es)

Working Group 3
Nanoscience Institute of Aragon
University of Zaragoza
Zaragoza, Spain

http://ina.unizar.es/

Prof. Santamaria´s group is developing new nano-enabled approaches to treat cancer. Most of the current activities are organized around catalytic nanoparticles used to target key nutrients and produce toxic molecules inside the tumor using bio-orthogonal catalysis. The laboratory activity includes controlled drug and catalyst delivery,  exosome-based delivery, and nano-hyperthermia. Currently available facilities relevant to this action include extensive nanoparticle characterization with state of the art microscopy, as well as animal testing facilities with several cancer models.


Prof. Jing Wang (jing.wang@ifu.baug.ethz.ch)

Working Group 2
Air Quality and Particle Technology, Institute of Environmental Engineering
ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology)
Zurich, Switzerland

http://www.ie.ifu.ethz.ch/

Prof. Wang’s group investigates the environmental and health impacts of nanomaterials and develops control technologies to mitigate the negative effects. Current studies include risk and toxicity assessment of graphene based nanocomposites and application of grouping, leading to read-across and classification of nanomaterials.


Prof. Joao Rodriguez (joaor@uma.pt)

Working Group 1
CQM – Centro de Química da Madeira
University of Madeira
Madeira, Portugal

http://www.uma.pt/jrmmrg

João Rodrigues’s group is working on the synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials for cancer therapy. In particular, the group is focused on metallodendrimers and other organometallic compounds containing ruthenium, platinum and copper in their structure. The labs of CQM-Centro de Química da Madeira are well equipped for chemical synthesis (including vacuum techniques) and materials characterization (NMR, MS, DLS, TRPS, SEM, contact angle, HPLC, GC, etc.), as well as for the in vitro biological evaluation of nanomaterials (cell culture lab, fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, etc.).


Prof. Jorge Rubio Retama (bjrubio@ucm.es)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Department of Chemistry in Pharmaceutical Sciences (MatNaBiO Research Group)
Complutense University of Madrid
Madrid, Spain

www.ucm.es/matnabio

Prof. Rubio-Retama has developed different synthetic routes to produce colloidal materials suitable for biomedical applications, such as microgels, nanogels, magnetic nanoparticles, upconverting nanoparticles or Ag2S nanoparticles. In addition, the group aims to the surface functionalization of these nanomaterials to provide them the appropriate physic-chemical properties for their biological application.  For this reason, the group has highly specialized techniques like spectroscopic techniques, TEM, SEM, FTIR, DSC, TGA….. in addition, the group is expert in SANS and IQNS, which are of great interest to determine the structure and dynamic of soft-matter.


Prof. Jovan Nedeljković (jovned@vin.bg.ac.rs)

MC substitute member
Working Group 2

Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry and Physics
Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinča, University of Belgrade
Belgrade, Serbia

https://www.vin.bg.ac.rs/en/science/vinca-institute-departments/237-department-of-radiation-chemistry-and-physics

Dr. Nedeljković's group is developing new organic-inorganic hybrids using oxide nanoparticles as carriers of biologically active molecules to determine their toxicity and antioxidant properties.  The laboratory activity includes DFT calculations, synthesis and variety of characterization. Currently available facilities at Dr Nedeljković's lab include different spectroscopic (UV-Vis, NIR, FTIR, PL), thermal (TGA, DSC), and microstructural (XRD, AFM) techniques.


Dr. Juan F. Santibanez (jfsantibanez@imi.bg.ac.rs)

MC substitute member
Working Group 3

Department of Molecular Biology
Institute for Medical Reseach, University of Belgrade
Belgrade, Serbia

http://www.imi.bg.ac.rs/eng/research-groups-centers-of-excellence/group-for-molecular-oncology

Our laboratory is interested in to determine:  the role of TGF-b in the interaction and internalization of liposomes and chitosan based  nanoparticles in transformed and endothelial cells; also, the interplay between chemotherapy targeting cytoskeleton on the internalization of nanoparticles by cancer cells, endothelial cells and myeloid cells.


Dr. Karol Ciepluch (karol.ciepluch@ujk.edu.pl)

Working Groups 2 and 3
Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Institute of Biology
Jan Kochanowski University
Kielce, Poland

https://biologia.ujk.edu.pl/struktura_ZBiG-en.php

Dr. Ciepluch is working on polymer conjugated proteins, their physico-chemical characterization, assessment of stability and interactions with nanoparticles for improvement of pharmacokinetic properties of both, therapeutic proteins and nanoparticles. Additionally, he is working on dendritic nanoparticles and their interactions with antibacterial proteins for development a new alternative to antibiotics.


Dr. Kegang Liu (kegang.liu@unibas.ch)

MC substitute member
Working Group 4

Spheroidals
Switzerland Innovation Park Basel Area
Basel, Switzerland

Website not available yet

Spherodials, founded in Basel, is focusing on novel nanodrugs development. There is a platform based on polymeric nanocarriers mainly targeting different cancers and atherosclerosis. The current activity of Spherodials includes novel nanomedicine design, synthesis, chemico-physical characterization, in vitro and in vivo (different animal model) evaluation, GLP and GMP production as well.


Prof. Khuloud Al-Jamal (Khuloud.al-jamal@kcl.ac.uk)

MC substitute member
Working Group 2

Institute of Pharmaceutical Science
School of Cancer and Pharmaceutical Sciences, King’s College
London, United Kingdom

https://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/khuloud-aljamal(4e743c3a-574c-4ef2-b205-12211b409e05).html

Prof. Al-Jamal’s current work involves pre-clinical translation of novel nanomaterials designed specifically for drug, protein, nucleic acids and radionuclide delivery for therapeutic or diagnostic applications. Our lab is specialised in formulating novel nanocarriers (carbon nanostructures, liposomes, exosomes, gold nanorods, exosomes, polymeric nanoparticles) followed by testing interactions with biological systems in vitro and in animal models. We have established a range of in vivo cancer models and multi-modality imaging techniques. Recently our lab has developed specific interests in early detection of cancer and cancer immunotherapy.


Prof. Leagh G. Powell (lp45@hw.ac.uk)

Working Groups 3 and 4
The Nano-Safety Research Group
Heriot Watt University
Edinburgh, United Kingdom

https://nano.hw.ac.uk/people.html

The Nano-Safety Research Group  is a multidisciplinary team based at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh with expertise in the assessment of the hazards (toxicity) posed by nanomaterials to human health in vitro and the environment. This group works together with EU project BIORIMA that aims to develop an integrated risk management framework for nanomaterials intended for medical use. The group is involved in a number of other national and international research projects that investigate the safety of nanomaterials.


Dr. Lisa Pizzol (lisa.pizzol@greendecision.eu)

Working Groups 3 and 4
GreenDecision srl
Venice, Italy

http://www.greendecision.eu

GreenDecision's main mission is the development of decision support systems for the risk assessment and management of nano(bio)materials.


Dr. Lorena Garcia Hevia (lorenag_84@hotmail.com)

Working Group 3
Laboratory of Nanomedicine, Department of Life Science
International Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL)
Braga, Portugal

https://inl.int/

Dr. Hevia's research is focused on developing and validating strategies of selective magnetic hyperthermia therapies in different in vitro and in vivo approaches. Our group are familiar with synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles and also the study of their use for targeting, imaging, and on‐demand release. In addition, our research is involved in understand and improve the ability of different nanomaterials to generate sources in magnetic hyperthermia therapy and multifunctional performance as T2-contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).


Prof. Lothar Elling (l.elling@biotec.rwth-aachen.de)

MC substitute member
Working Group 1
Laboratory for Biomaterials, Institute for Biotechnology and Helmholtz-Institute for Biomedical Engineering
RWTH Aachen University
Aachen, Germany

http://www.biotec-biomat.rwth-aachen.de

Prof. Elling’s group develops glycoconjugates (e.g. neo-glycoproteins) for the targeted inhibition of cancer related galectins. Further work is related to fusion proteins of cancer related galectins for targting to altered glycan sites of cancer cells and targeted imaging. The laboratory activity includes chemo-enzymatic synthesis of glycoconjugates, synthetic coupling strategies to nanomaterials, and characterization of sugar and lectin binding, carbohydrate analysis.


Dr. Maciej Stanczyk (macstanczyk@gmail.com)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 3 and 4
Deparment of Surgical Oncology
Salve Lodz
Lodz, Poland

https://salve.pl/

I am an oncologist treating mostly breast cancer, my point of interest is the new approach to cancer tretment, projects of nanocarriers and targeted particles, dendrimers in anticancer therapy.


Dr. Maja Nešić Radisavljević (maki@vin.bg.ac.rs)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Department of Atomics Physics, Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences
University of Belgrade
Belgrade, Serbia

https://www.vin.bg.ac.rs/en/science/vinca-institute-departments/238-department-of-atomics-physics

Dr. Nešić's research is focused on the formation and development of light-triggered nanocomposite systems based on potential anticancer drugs and nano-carriers. She is currently combining UV absorbing TiO2 nanoparticles and polysaccharide-functionalized fullerenes with different potential anticancer drugs. The laboratory activities include nanosystem synthesis, physico-chemical characterization, as well as biological evaluation of nanomaterials (cell culture lab, cellular uptake, localization and underlying mechanisms of antitumor effects). 


Prof. Marco Radi (marco.radi@unipr.it)

Working Group 1
MR Research Lab, Department of Food and Drug
University of Parma
Parma, Italy

https://sites.google.com/site/marcoradi/home

Prof. Radi’s group is developing new small-molecule anticancer agents targeting kinases and GPCRs. Chemical and in silico tools are routinely used in the Radi lab to convert physical interactions into small molecules able to modulate or repair a damaged biological process causing a specific disease. Combinatorial and computational techniques are employed to speed-up the identification of the drug-candidate by rational exploration of the biologically relevant chemical space. Ongoing research projects deal with the development of GPER-1 inhibitors for breast cancer, I1-IR inhibitors as adjuvants for doxorubicin-insensitive cancers, Bcr-Abl inhibitors (ATP- competitive and allosteric) for leukemia, and CXCR4 down-regulators to block CXCR4-dependent cancer metastasis.


Dr. Maria de la Fuente Freire (maria.fuente.freire@gmail.com)

Working Group 3
Nano-oncology Unit
Health Research Insitute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS)/Clinical University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela (CHUS)
Santiago de Compostela, Spain

http://www.oncomet.es/en/nano-oncology-lab/

Dr. de la Fuente’s group is devoted to the development of innovative tools based on nanotechnology to provide solutions to confront one of the biggest current challenges in oncology, the formation and progression of metastasis. The team is composed by chemist, pharmacists and biologists, in constant communication with medical doctors to accomplish this ambitious aim and move nanotechnology forward to a clinical setting. The laboratory is equipped with the necessary equipment to produce and characterized the nanoformulations. Cell culture rooms and animal facilities are also available.


Dr. Maria Jose Santos-Martinez (santosmm@tcd.ie)

MC substitute member
Working Group 3
School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Trinity College Dublin
The University of Dublin
Dublin, Ireland

http://pharmacy.tcd.ie/staff/santosmm/?profile=santosmm

Prof. Santos-Martinez’s research interests are focused on platelet biology, cancer, and biocompatibility and safety of nanomaterials (nanoparticle-cell and nanoparticle-platelet interactions). She uses the Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technology to investigate the interactions of nanoparticles and nanomaterials with biological systems.


Dr. Maria Manuela Gaspar (mgaspar@ff.ulisboa.pt)

Working Group 3
Nanostructured Systems for Overcoming Biological Barriers (Nano2B)
Research Institute for Medicines, iMed.ULisboa
Lisboa, Portugal

http://imed.ulisboa.pt/cv/maria-manuela-de-jesus-guilherme-gaspar/

Dr. Gaspar's  research has been focused on design, development and biological evaluation of drug delivery systems for improving the therapeutic index of incorporated molecules in infectious, inflammatory and cancer animal models. Conception, development and physicochemical characterization of appropriated systems for different routes of administration of constructed nanoformulations namely parenteral, pulmonary, oral, topical. In vitro screening of new synthesized molecules. Establishment of methodologies for assessing the in vivo profile of nanoformulations particularly cancer models (melanoma, colon, lung, pancreas).  The research infrastructures at iMed.ULisboa include specific facilities for drug development of innovative drug delivery systems, including nanomedicines, cell culture, biology and radioisotope laboratoires. The animal facilities, approved by Portuguese authorities, where several rodent animal models are established and under routine use namely, biodistribution and toxicity studies, disease modeling studies, including animal models of infection, acute and chronic inflammation, xenograft tumors, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, neurodegenerative diseases.


Dr. Maria Torgensen (marialy@rr-research.no)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 2 and 3
Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Molecular Cell Biology
Oslo University Hospital
Oslo, Norway

https://www.ous-research.no/torgersen/

Dr. Torgersen’s project group is interested in the relationship between nanomaterials and autophagy. The laboratory is in the process of establishing a wide range of cellular methods to study the effect of nanomaterials on various types of autophagy.


Prof. Maria Zablocka (zabloc@cbmm.lodz.pl)

MC substitute member
Working Group 1
Centre of Molecular and Macromolecular Studies
Polish Academy of Science
Lodz, Poland

https://www.cbmm.lodz.pl

Prof. Zablocka is mainly concerned with the synthesis of dendrimers and more precisely of phosphorus dendrimers as well as various types of phosphorus dendrons, playing with their size and functionalization with the goal to prepare highly water soluble derivatives for their use in nanomedicine.


Dr. Marijana Petkovic (marijana.petkovic@staff.uma.pt)

Working Group 2
CQM - Centro de Química da Madeira
Universidade da Madeira
Funchal, Portugal

Dr. Petkovic is engaged in the development of methods for detection and charactrizaation of small molecules and nano-structured materials by, MALDI MS and other techniques.


Dr. Mariangela Garofalo (mariangela.garofalo@hotmail.it)

Working Group 3
Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences
Univerity of Padua
Padua, Italy

https://www.dsfarm.unipd.it/mariangela-garofalo

Dr. Garofalo's research interests are in cancer therapy field, with particular focus on cancer drug delivery and development of oncolytic viral-based therapies. The laboratory activity deals with the definition of tools and techniques to improve the delivery of peptides, biological drugs and chemotherapeutic agents using oncolytic adenoviruses and extracellular vesicles. Currently available facilities are access to animal imaging including optical and MRI to properly follow tumor growth, molecular biology and cell culture room for all genetic and cell manipulations.


Dr. Marios Krokidis (m.krokidis@inn.demokritos.gr)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 3 and 4
Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
National Center for Scientific Research ''Demokritos''
Agia Paraskevi, Greece

http://www.demokritos.gr/

Dr. Krokidis’s research interests are centered on novel diagnostic and prognostic markers discovery against inflammatory disorders and drug toxicity assessment utilizing bioanalytical, biochemical and molecular biology methodologies.


Dr. Marta Maria Natile (martamaria.natile@unipd.it)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Institute of Condensed Matter Chemistry and Technologies for Energy (ICMATE)
National Research Council (CNR)
Padua, Italy

http://www.icmate.cnr.it/en/

Dr Natile’s group is developing novel multifunctional nanosystems for simultaneous diagnostic and therapy (photo-activated chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy) based on near infrared light upconverting nanoparticles. The activities include rational design and synthesis of nanoparticles, their functionalization with appropriate molecules and/or drug as well as their structural and physico-chemical characterization by state of art facilities (XRD, XPS, DLS, DRIFT, TEM, SEM, UV-vis-NIR, steady-state and time resolved spectroscopies).


Dr. Martin Hrubý (hruby@imc.cas.cz)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 2
Department of Supramolecular Polymer Systems
Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Czech Academy of Science
Prague, Czech Republic

https://www.imc.cas.cz/en/umch/o_supramol.html

Dr. Hrubý´s group is developing self-assembled nanosystems based on polymers responsive to external stimuli for biomedicinal purposes. Currently available facilities at Dr. Hrubý´s lab are synthetic labs including complete physico-chemical monomer, polymer and nanoparticle characterization background, radionuclide laboratory, isothermal titration calorimetry, DLS, SLS, SAXS.


Dr. Maxim Abakumov (abakumov_ma@rsmu.ru)

NCC MC observer
Working Groups 1 and 3
Department of medical nanobiotechnology
Russian National Research Medical University
Moscow, Russia

http://rsmu.ru/4240.html

Dr. Abakumov research is focused on the application of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer theranosticsm and the assessment of toxicity and biocompatibility of iron oxide nanoparticles.


Dr. Mihaela Roxana Cimpan (mihaela.cimpan@uib.no)

Working Groups 2, 3 and 4
Department of Clinical Dentistry_Biomaterials, Faculty of Medicine
University of Bergen
Bergen, Norway

https://www.uib.no/en/persons/Mihaela.Roxana.Cimpan

Dr. Cimpan's group covers expertise in biomaterials and nanomaterials, microfluidics, e-beam lithography, biophysics, analytical and physical chemistry, electronics, molecular biology, cell biology, microarrays, superarrays, advanced microscopy, metrology, statistics, and performs in vitro cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, nanoparticle uptake and intercellular transfer studies on cells and 3D reconstructed tissues and organs. Dr. Cimpan is also involved in projects investigating the knowledge, perception and attitude of students and medical personnel regarding nanotechnology used in dentistry and medicine and nanosafety.


Dr. Mingxing Wei (ming@cellvax-pharma.com)

MC substitute member
Working Group 3
Cellvax SAS
Maisons-Alfort, France

https://cellvax-pharma.com/

Cellvax, founded in 2001, is a French SME which provides complete preclinical innovating drug validation studies both in vitro and in vivo (rodents and non-rodents) allowing to accelerate the drug development process for unmet needs related to severe human diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. The core business of Cellvax is in preclinical studies, such as efficacy studies in animal models, GLP toxicology studies, PK/PD biodistribution studies, etc. Since its foundation, Cellvax has achieved a remarkable record as a SME, thanks to its expertise in different animal models.


Dr. Minos Matsoukas (mmatsoukas@cloudpharm.eu)

MC substitute member
Working Group 1

Computational Drug Design
CloudPharm PC
Athens, Greece

www.cloudpharm.eu

Cloudpharm is a startup bio-pharmaceutical R&D company founded and established in Greece in 2016. Its core business focuses on the discovery of bioactive compounds with pharmacological interest. Among others, the activity of the company emphasizes in the computational design of nanocarriers for bioactive molecules against a range of diseases. This involves simulation studies in our computer facilities, powered by cloud computing.


Dr. Miroslava Matuskova (exonmigu@savba.sk)

Working Group 3
Department of Molecular Oncology
Cancer Research Institute, Biomedical Research Center, Slovak Academy of Sciences
Bratislava, Slovakia

http://www.biomedcentrum.sav.sk/research-departments/oddelenie-molekularnej-onkologie/?lang=en

Our group is focused on evaluation of efficacy and safety (in vitro and in vivo) of combined anticancer therapy mediated by nanocarriers.


Dr. Monica Lopez Fanarraga (fanarrag@unican.es)

Working Group 3
Laboratory of Nanomedicine-IDIVAL
School of Pharmacy
University of Cantabria
Santander, Spain

https://mlfanarraga.wixsite.com/grupo-nanomedicina

Our group has described carbon nanotube´s intrinsic ability to bind to microtubules vivo severely interfering with the dynamics of these tubulin polymers, triggering biomechanical impediment and antitumoral effects in vivo. Recently, we have improved MWCNTs intracellular biodegradation and used MWCNTS as active-by-design nanocarriers, significantly enhancing the antitumoral effect of traditional drugs.


Prof. Moein Moghimi (seyed.moghimi@ncl.ac.uk)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4
School of Pharmacy
Newcastle University
Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/icm/people/profile/seyedmoghimi.html#background

The work in Prof. Moghimi’s laboratory is directed towards 1) fundamental understanding of the pathophysiology of biological barriers in relation to targeted drug delivery and the role of innate immune system in relation to nanomedicine performance and safety; 2) development of new materials and patent-protected intellectual properties for experimental treatment in cancer; 3)  detailed mapping of nanopharmaceutical “structure-activity” relationships at single cell and molecular levels, but also  long-term concomitant extensive computational network knowledge of genomics and epigenomics of inter-individual variations to nanoformulation performance, and adverse drug and nanomaterial responses.


Dr. Natalia Shcharbina (nata.shcharbina@mail.ru)

NCC MC observer
Working Groups 3 and 4
Clinical-Diagnostical Laboratory
Medical Center "Eleous"

Belarus
Website not available yet

Dr. Shcharbina's main interests focus on the interactions of nanoparticles (dendrimers, nanoparticles of metals) with blood cells and proteins.


Prof. Nguyen T. K. Thanh (ntk.thanh@ucl.ac.uk)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 2
Biophysics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy
UCL Healthcare Biomagnetic and Nanomaterials Laboratories
University College of London (UCL)
London, UK

http://www.ntk-thanh.co.uk/

Prof. Thanh’s group is developing new nanomedicines for targeting cancer. The laboratory activity includes design, synthesis, and chemico-physical characterization of nanomaterials (plasmonic and magnetic) in conjuncation with chemotherapy for cancer treatment. Currently available facilities at Prof. Thanhis lab are TEM, XRD, SQUID, TGA, FTIR, UV-VIs, DLS, Flow cytometry, live cell imager, glove box, microwave and high temperature and high pressure reactors, biological lab with cell incubator facilities.


Prof. Nicolas H. Voelcker (ntk.thanh@ucl.ac.uk)

COST International Partner Countries
MC observer

Working Groups 1, 2 and 3
Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication
Monash University
Melbourne, Australia
http://nanomelbourne.com/voelckerlab/

The core research activity in Prof. Voelcker’s laboratory is the study of silicon-based nanostructures and their surface chemistry. His applied research focuses on using those nanomaterials in medical devices including drug delivery systems, biosensors, and materials for cell therapy, in strong collaboration with clinicians and the medtech industry. The Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication and the Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences offer a range of equipment and infrastructure for manufacture of drug delivery systems and their in vitro and in vivo characterisation.


Dr. Olga Swiech (oswiech@chem.uw.edu.pl)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 1 and 2
Laboratory of Bionanostructures, Biological and Chemical Research Centre
University of Warsaw
Warsaw, Poland

http://cnbch.uw.edu.pl/language/en/research_groupes/laboratory-of-bionanostructures/

Our group is developing new drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles and cyclodextrins for targeting therapy of anthracycline drug. The laboratory activity includes synthesis as well as physical and chemical characterization. Currently available facilities at Dr Swiech's lab: fully equipped laboratory for organic synthesis, potentiostats (Autolab PGSTAT-Eco Chemie BV, Utrecht, The Netherlands and EC Epsilon - Basi) for the electrochemical studies, UV-Vis spectrometer (Cary 60, Agilent Technologies with thermostated cuvette holder), FTIR infrared spectrophotometer with ATR (Vertex 70), atomic force microscope PicoPlus 5500 AFM (Agilent), the scanning tunneling microscope (Nanoscope IIIa - Digital Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA) and Zetasizer (Malvern) for dynamic light scattering measurement.


Dr. Paolo Gasco (paolo.gasco@nanovector.it)

Working Groups 3 and 4
R&D
Nanovector srl
Turin, Italy

http://www.nanovector.it/

Nanovector develops lipid based colloidal formulations and has been involved in many projects targeting different kind of cancers. All needed equipments for preparation and physico-chemical characterization of nanoparticles and microemulsions are available (HPLCs, DLS, DSC..), as well as a small clean room (ISO 5) is kept operating for prototyping in GMP-like condition.


Prof. Pedro V. Baptista (pmvb@fct.unl.pt)

Working Groups 2 and 3
Nanomedicine@FCT, Department of Life Sciences, School of Science and Technology
Universidade NOVA de Lisboa
Lisboa, Portugal

https://www.requimte.pt/ucibio/research-groups/lab/nanomedicine

Prof.Baptista’s group is developing nanosensors for evaluation of cell internalisation and trafficking of multifunctional nanoparticles (nanotheranostics systems), transport in and across exosmoses, and using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models to optimize targeted delivery nanosystems for RNAi and chemotherapeutics. Also focusing on cell uptake and toxicology of nanomaterials. Additional focus has been dedicated to the development of combinatory strategies based on nanoparticles and their properties to tackle chemotherapy resistance in cancer models. Prof. Baptista has also been optimizing nanosensors based on isothermal molecular detection schemes. At Nanomedicine@FCT Lab there are access to several facilities, e.g. DNA/RNA manipulation; cell culture and imaging; flow cytometry; CD; ITC; DLS/Zeta; laser; 3D printing; microfluidics design.


Dr. Penelope Bouziotis (bouzioti@rrp.demokritos.gr)

MC substitute member
Working Group 3
Radiochemical Studies Laboratory
Institute of Nuclear & Radiological Sciences & Technology, Energy & Safety
National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos"
Athens, Greece

Website not available yet

Dr. Bouziotis’ group is working on the development of dual-modality SPECT/MR and PET/MR imaging agents, as well as novel nanoparticle theranostic agents, after radiolabeling of nanostructures with gamma-, beta-, alpha- and positron- emitting radioisotopes. Currently available facilities at Dr. Bouziotis’ lab include: hot cells and hoods for the safe handling & radiochemical processing of γ-, β-, α- and positron-emitters; HPLC; electronic autoradiography system; capillary electrophoresis system; gel electrophoresis system; optical microscope. Finally, the lab also has an Animal Housing Facility, for the housing of experimental animals during the development of appropriate cancer models, which has been licensed by the Veterinary Department of the Athens Prefecture (Ref. EL 25 BIO 022). It is also licensed by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission for import and use of a wide variety of radioisotopes.


Prof. Roberto Quesada (rquesada@ubu.es)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Department of Chemistry
University of Burgos
Burgos, Spain

https://www.ubu.es/bioorganic-bioorg

Our interests focus on the study and development of organic compounds with applications in biomedicine. In particular the design of small molecules capable of facilitating the transmembrane transport of anions. These compounds are able to disrupt the cellular homeostasis and intracellular pH levels. We are exploring the applications of such compounds as novel anticancer agents as well as their use in the treatment of conditions related to defective ion transport at the cellular level such as Cystic Fibrosis. Our background is synthetic organic chemistry. We have an important experience in the use of phospholipid vesicle based assays to characterize facilitate transport processes.


Dr. Sanja Vranjes-Djuric (sanjav@vinca.rs)

Working Group 3
Laboratory for radioisotopes (LR)
Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences
Belgrade, Serbia

https://www.vin.bg.ac.rs/en/science/vinca-institute-departments/257-department-of-radioisotopes

Dr Vranjes's group is developing new radiopharmaceuticals based on the biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles radiolabelled with different radionuclides for dual radionuclide-hyperthermia therapy. LR is completely equipped for the application of the radiotracer method as the most reliable method for biodistribution studies on healthy and tumor bearing mice. The laboratory activity includes: synthesis and complete characterization of nanomaterials including magnetic and radiolabelled nanomaterials, investigation of their effect in vitro on cell culture, in vivo hyperthermia studies, biodistribution studies using In Vivo Xtreme Multimodal 2D planar imager as well as gamma camera. The group consists of experienced researches from different scientific fields including chemistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine.


Prof. Sarit Larisch (slarisch@univ.haifa.ac.il)

Working Group 3
Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Research
Department of Biology and Human Biology
University of Haifa
Haifa, Israel

http://larischlab.haifa.ac.il

Prof. Larisch's group is investigating molecular mechanisms of apoptosis and carcinogenesis. We are developing new small molecules as anti-cancer drugs. This novel compounds inhibit and degrade their target proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome system to promote cancer cell killing . Currently available facilities at Prof. Larisch's lab are access to FPLC, confocal micrscopes, MST assays, biochemical and cell killing analysis of drugs, usage of BME organoids, We have an animal facility at the University of Haifa which is a barrier facility comprising 1000 sq. ft. (240 cages). All mice are housed under Specific-pathogen-free (SPF) conditions in ventilated microisolator cages. 


Prof. Sebnem Ercelen Ceylan (sebnem.ercelen@tubitak.gov.tr)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 2 and 3
Bionanotechnology Lab
TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Institute
Gebze/ Kocaeli, Turkey

http://gmbe.mam.tubitak.gov.tr/en

We are working on development and characterization of therapeutic delivery systems such as biocompatable polymers, liposomes, nanotubes and  natural vesicular systems such as exosomes (we have a patent application) and niosomes.  We have completed projects on non-viral gene delivery and have expertise and research infrastructure for the biophysical and physico-chemical characterization of these carriers. We have access to fluorimeter, luminometer, zetasizer, Time-Lapse Fluorescence Invert Microscope, cell culture facilities etc.


Dr. Smilja Marković (smilja.markovic@itn.sanu.ac.rs)

Working Group 2
Institute of Technical Sciences of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts
Belgrade, Serbia

www.itn.sanu.ac.rs/smiljamarkovic_eng.html

Dr. Smilja Marković deals with physico-chemical characterization (XRD, Raman, FTIR, PL and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, TG/DTA/DSC) of materials for nanomedical application, biomaterials, drug delivery, cell labeling, etc. The main interest is correlation of point-defect chemistry with functional properties of materials.


Dr. Soner Dogan (soner.dogan@yeditepe.edu.tr)

Working Group 3
Department of Medical Biology, School of Medicine
Yeditepe University
Ataşehir/İstanbul, Turkey

http://med.yeditepe.edu.tr/sites/default/files/cv_of_dr_dogan_in_english_for_tubitak_january2016.pdf

Prof. Dogan’s group is interested in drug delivery system in breast cancer both in invitro and in-vivo models. Specifically controlled gated drug delivery system has been studied. In addition, we are studying the roles of calorie restriction in targeted drug delivery.


Dr. Sonia Melle (smelle@fis.ucm.es)

Working Group 2
Department of Optics, Faculty of Optics
University Complutense of Madrid
Madrid, Spain

 https://webs.ucm.es/info/mclab/sonia_melle.html

Prof. Melle’s group in collaboration with MagNaBio research group at the UCM leading by Prof. Rubio-Retama are developing new fluorescent nanoprobes for biomedical applications. Prof. Melle’s lab activity is based on the optical characterization of the fluorescent nanoprobes. Currently available experimental techniques are quantum yield measurements, time resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements, fluorescence spectroscopy, etc… 


Dr. Sonja Jovanović (sonja.jovanovic@ijs.si)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Advanced Materials Department
Jozef Stefan Institute
Ljubljana, Slovenia

http://www-k9.ijs.si/

Dr. Sonja Jovanović research focus is developing magnetic nanocomposites for bio-applications. The laboratory activity includes synthesis and physicochemical characterization of obtained materials (XRD, TG/DTA, UV-VIS, TEM, VSM etc).


Mag. pharm MSc. Susanne Resch (susanne.resch@bionanonet.at)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 2 and 4
Health, Safety and Medicine
BioNanoNet Forschungsgesellschaft mbH
Graz, Austria

www.bionanonet.at

Dr. Resch's interests focuse on nanosafety in nanomedicine and regulation and standardisation related to nanotechnologies and nanomedicine.


Dr. Tomáš Strašák (strasak@icpf.cas.cz)

MC substitute member
Working Group 1
Department of Bioorganic Compounds and Nanocomposites
Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the Czech Academy of Science
Prague, Czech Republic

http://www.icpf.cas.cz/en/department-bioorganic-compounds-and-nanocomposites

Dr. Strašák’s lab is working on rational design of dendrimers and complex macromolecular and supramolecular systems based on dendritic compounds. The products of our research are finding applications in gene therapy or in targeted transport of drugs including chemotherapeutics and their conjugates with saccharides, that we are currently developing. Our lab have access to several analytical tools including NMR, IR, UV-Vis, HRMS , DLS, etc.


Dr. Tore Geir Iversen (toregi@rr-research.no)

MC substitute member
Working Group 3
Department of Cell Biology, Institute for Cancer Research
Oslo University Hospital, The Norwegian Radium Hospital
Oslo, Norway

https://www.ous-research.no/iversen/

Our group is developing biodegradable nanomedicines for cancer diagnostics and therapy in close iterative collaboration with groups that has the expertise in nanomedicine production and characterization (WG1-2). Uptake and intracellular transport of NPs in different cancer cells are studied by confocal microscopy, super-resolution microscopy (SIM), TIRF and live-cell imaging techniques. Furthermore, cell-based toxicity assays are used as well as assays to more specifically study various cellular mechanisms (oxidative/ER stress, autophagy) that might be implicated in cell death.


Dr. Tore Skotland (torsko@rr-research.no)

MC substitute member
Working Groups 3 and 4
Department of Molecular Cell Biology
Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital
Oslo, Norway

https://www.ous-research.no/skotland/

Dr. Skotland is a member of the Sandvig group which focuses on testing new nanomedicines for targeting cancer. The group studies entry into cells, intracellular transport, and death mechanisms induced by nanoparticles. The effect of the particles on tumor models in mice is studied in collaboration with Prof. G. Mælandsmo. Skotland has a long experience from heading ADME studies in Pharmaceutical R&D and has been involved in bringing five products to the market.


Dr. Tracey D. Bradshaw (tracey.bradshaw@nottingham.ac.uk)

Working Group 3
School of Pharmacy
University of Nottingham
Nottingham, United Kingdom

https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/pharmacy/

Tracey Bradshaw`s research focusses on discovery and development of novel anticancer therapies. Specifically, investigation of antitumour activity and elucidation of mechanisms of action and molecular targets of newly discovered natural products, novel imidazotetrazine and benzothiazole analogues and preparation of biocompatible nano-sizes drug delivery vehicles for treatment of intractable malignancies. We are developing apoferritin-encapsualted formulations of i) temozolomide analogues to treat temozolomide-resistant brain tumours; ii) antitumour benzothiazoles to treat benzothiazole-sensitive malignancies including breast, ovarian and gastric tumours; iii) jerantinine to minimise systemic exposure to this potent natural product.


Dr. Tung Duc Le (t.le@ucl.ac.uk)

Working Group 2
UCL Healthcare Biomagnetic and Nanomaterials Laboratory and Biophysics Group, Department of Physics & Astronomy
University College London
London, United Kingdom

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/

Dr. Le's group is developing the nanoparticles for cancer treatment. The laboratory activity includes synthesis and characterization. Currently available facilities at Dr. Tung's lab are access to TEM, XRD, TGA, SQUID, DLS, Magnetic hyperthermia, Centrifuge, UV-Vis, FTIR, Flow cytometer, Live Cell Imager.


Prof. Twan Lammers (tlammers@ukaachen.de)

Working Group 3
Department of Nanomedicine and Theranostics, Institute for Experimental Molecular Imaging (ExMI)
RWTH Aachen University Clinic
Aachen, Germany

www.exmi.rwth-aachen.de/nano

Prof. Lammers’ group aims to individualize and improve cancer therapy by combining drug targeting with imaging. To this end, the lab develops image-guided (theranostic) drug delivery systems, as well as materials and methods to longitudinally monitor tumor growth, angiogenesis, inflammation and metastasis. A key objective for the next couple of years is to bring together scientists, societies and companies working in this relatively broad area of research, in order to intensify their interaction and collaboration, and to thereby facilitate the translation of several innovative (nano-) theranostic constructs and concepts into the clinic.


Dr. Ulf Kahlert (Ulf.Kahlert@med.uni-duesseldorf.de)

Working Group 3
Clinic for Neurosurgery & German Cancer Consortium (DKTK)
University Hospital Dusseldorf
Dusseldorf, Germany
https://www.uni-duesseldorf.de/home/en/university-hospital.html

In one branch in my department, we aim to develop novel anti-cancer stem cell therapies for deadly diseases like glioblastoma (but not only) where currently no good treatment option is available. We have developed several advances experimental researches, particular  in vitro stem-cell focused tumor models. We have a collection of patient-derived systems (primary short-term avatars of our patients, chronic spheroidal-grown cell lines ) as well as iPSC-based in vitro models with for molecular subtypes of tumors as well as reporter cancer cell lines to sensitively inform on stem cell capacity based on pathway activation. Those tools, combined with high resolution metabolic and methylomic profiling enables us to identify actionable candidates that may serve as druggable targets to eradicate tumors. Moreover, focusing on low grad brain tumors, we are working on a fluorescence-peptide-mediated approach of theranostics using clinical applied treatment of photodynamic therapy.


Prof. Valentin Ceña (valentin.cena@gmail.com)

MC substitute member
Working Group 3

Unidad Asociada Neurodeath
University of Castilla-La Mancha
Ciudad Real, Spain

https://www.uclm.es/home

Prof. Ceña's group is working on the interaction nanoparticle/siRNA in 2 main areas of research: use of nanoparticle-delivered siRNA for cancer therapeutics and the use of nanoparticles and siRNA as possible therapy in neurodegenerative diseases (mainly focussed on Alzheimer disease and multiple sclerosis). The group has a lot of experience in different cellular (single cell imaging, electrophysiology, apoptosis, immun histochemistry, etc.) and molecular (RT-PCR, DNA and RNA extraction and sequencing, etc.) as well as in animal models of disease.


Dr. Vasco D. B. Bonifacio (vasco.bonifacio@tecnico.ulisboa.pt)

Working Groups 1, 2 and 3
Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences
Instituto Superior Técnico - University of Lisbon
Lisbon, Portugal

www.bonifacio.ws

Dr. Vasco Bonifácio research is focused in the design and green synthesis of luminescent dendrimers (non-aromatic luminophores) for nano- and radiotheranostics. Polyurea dendrimers are exceptional platforms for stem cell differentiation, and gene and drug delivery, especially in dry powder formulations for inhalation chemotherapy.


Dr. Vesna Lazic (vesna.lazic@vin.bg.ac.rs)

Working Group 2
Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry and Physics
Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade
Belgrade, Serbia

https://www.vin.bg.ac.rs/istrazivanja/istrazivaci/474-vesna-lazic-naucni-saradnik

Dr. Vesna Lazic is developing new organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials for biological applications. The laboratory activity includes synthesis and characterization of hybrid nanomaterials, as well as antimicrobial and antioxidative ability and genotoxic and antigenotoxic properties. Currently available facilities at Dr Lazic's lab include different spectroscopic (UV-Vis, NIR, FTIR) and microstructural (XRD, AFM) techniques.


Dr. Rer. Nat. Vladimir Sivakov (vladimir.sivakov@leibniz-ipht.de)

Working Groups 2 and 3
Department of Functional Interfaces, Group Semiconductor Nanostructures
Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology
Jena, Germany

https://www.leibniz-ipht.de/en/research-units/research-departments/functional-interfaces/overview.html

Dr. Sivakov’s group is working on development of porous drug containers based on biocompatible and biodegradable porous silicon nanoparticles and nanoneedles synthesis and physico-chemical studies, and their activation using ultrasound or high frequency irradiation. The main focus is related to the multi-modal bioimaging of cancer cells using high resolution and high sensitivity fluorescence microscopy and Raman micro-spectroscopy techniques.


Dr. Wafa Al-Jamal (w.al-jamal@qub.ac.uk)

Working Groups 1, 2 and 3
School of Pharmacy/ Nanomedicine and Biotherapeutics
Queen’s University Belfast
Belfast, United Kingdom

Dr Wafa Al-Jamal's lab

Dr Al-Jamal’s group focuses on engineering  smart materials (temperature and pH-sensitive) offering on-demand drug release, and image-guided drug delivery. Our lab also develops novel nanomedicines and theranostics for cancer and other applications.  We fabricate a wide range of delivery systems, such as nanotubes, liposomes, lipid-nanoparticle hybrids, protein, and polymeric nanoparticles, and exosome-mimetics to deliver a variety of therapeutics, vaccines, and immunotherapeutics. We have expertise and facilities to scale up nanoparticles production using microfluidics, as performing pre-clinical testing in cancer models.


Dr. Yiota Gregoriou (yiotagregoriou@hotmail.com)

Working Groups 1 and 2
Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Chemoprevention, Department of Biology
University of Cyprus
Cyprus

https://ucy.ac.cy/biol/en/research/20-en-topm/50-andreasioannoucostantinou

Dr. Gregoriou’s research interests include the design, formulation, physicochemical characterization and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of nanosized drugs for theranostics, validation and optimization of the properties of drug delivery systems, and to their ability to be used for pre-screening patients and enabling personalized medicine.  I am particularly interested on illustrating and visualizing how well these theranostic carrier materials deliver pharmacologically active agents to the pathological site, and how well they prevent them from accumulating in potentially endangered healthy tissues.


 

 

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